Selected Reviews, Desert Body Creep:


“Desert Body Creep performed by Angela Goh is brilliant, no two ways about it, it’s the kind of performance that makes you want to go back and revisit a second or even third time… it’s decidedly gen y, youthful and full of vigour… humorous and wild yet somehow restrained, the resulting effect makes you want to get inside the mind of this brilliant young performer…Desert Body Creep is measured, composed and full of a decidedly attractive sense of self assurance.”

Jessi Lewis, “Desert Body Creep”, Toorak Times & Tagg, May 19, 2016
Full article: https://tagg.com.au/desert-body-creep/


“Desert Body Creep is in full command of its themes—consumption, mutability, horror and decay are enacted in a series of transformations of Goh’s body.

Alison Finn, “Dance, decay & transformation”, RealTime issue #132 April-May 2016
Full article: http://www.realtimearts.net/feature/DanceWrite_Workshop_Next_Wave_2016/12277


“Abduction, possession, reanimation—it’s the stuff of midnight movie specials, and apt, given that the piece is, in many ways, a horror story. Yet it’s never quite clear what, or who, is the monster, as every object, no matter how seemingly benign, is made monstrous, only to be consumed, or contained, so that the audience comes instead to be haunted by a cool and unflinching emptiness. The audience’s fear then, is drawn not from things being given life, from spent objects rising from the dead or the dancer transmogrifying behind ever more hideous guises. The fear is that there will come a point, maybe inside this very room, when there is nothing left to consume or transform. The fear is not of an insatiable hunger, but of infinite reprisal without chaos, art-making without desire or fear.”

Elyssia Bugg, “Shaking Loose the Self”, RealTime issue #132 April-May 2016
Full article: http://www.realtimearts.net/feature/DanceWrite_Workshop_Next_Wave_2016/12270


“Desert Body Creep is something of a post-anthropocene hallucination. As Goh literally moves through choreographies, sounds, and objects, the mundane becomes uncanny… It’s a methodical yet dizzying evolution involving a giant gummy worm, a mint-hued crushed velvet tube, and shrinkwrap, underscored in cinematic turns by shredding guitar solos, pop music, and Goh’s own voice in haunting choral overtones. The result is a capitvating, unaffected disorientation posing questions of objectification inside the environment and the body.”

Sara Lyons, “In Performance: Desert Body Creep”, Contemporary Performance, Jan. 20, 2018
Full article: https://contemporaryperformance.com/2018/01/20/in-performance-angela-goh-desert-body-creep-coil/


“Angela Goh’s transformation through dance, was equal parts defiance and mischief… Goh was playful and yet in control… a compulsively watchable performance.”

Nicole Serratore, “Beyond Whiteness: A January Festival Wrap-Up”, American Theatre, Feb. 02, 2018
Full article: https://www.americantheatre.org/2018/02/02/beyond-whiteness-a-january-festival-wrap-up/


“Tender, disciplined, shapeshifting… The patchwork of referents that make up Desert Body Creep — including art, cinema, literature, pop and the internet — are individually familiar. But they come together in unexpected ways: fear is funny, worms elicit tenderness, abjection has poise and structure. Goh short-circuits, too, any totalising concepts about the body — about the female body — and about what it means to be human.”

Gemma Weston, “Review: Desert Body Creep”, Un Magazine, Issue 11.1, 2017
Full article: http://unprojects.org.au/magazine/issues/issue-11-1/desert-body-creep/



Selected Reviews, Uncanny Valley Girl:


“Techno blasts, the lights are a luscious red, and Goh slowly twists her body from side to side, undulating her arms. We are witnessing the birth of a robotic Venus… Goh’s body moves with eerie precision at a glacial pace. Becoming imperceptible, she is a machine in concert with other machines… It’s dystopian but also quite funny and weirdly beautiful… Uncanny Valley, Girl isn’t cyberfeminism exhorting networked utopian futures, nor is it an enactment of paranoid fears around dystopic simulacra. Yet the ambivalence Goh cultivates is not an ironic cop-out but a passionate attentiveness to a vast spectrum of nuance.”

Tessa Laird, “Discursions: Angela Goh, Uncanny Valley, Girl”, Art and Australia, April 6, 2018
Full article: http://www.artandaustralia.com/online/discursions/angela-goh-uncanny-valley-girl



Selected Reviews, Scum Ballet:


“Angela Goh’s Scum Ballet was a remarkable feat of contradiction and harmony… Goh continually surprised and engaged audiences through a choreography that married moments of tenderness with an awareness of heightened risk, danger and violence… The magic of Goh’s performance came through its straddling of intentionality and organic movement, the result of which warped any sense of real world time… The speed of the performance was constantly in flux yet invariably measured and intense, at once both effortless and planned.”

Isabella Cornell, “Chaos and Control in Angela Goh’s Scum Ballet”, Runway Magazine, Nov. 30, 2017
Full article: http://conversations.runway.org.au/conversations/chaos-control-angela-gohs-scum-ballet/


“Seductive and mystical, Scum Ballet is a litany of lucid passes… Goh relays an unrelenting cache of suspenseful and haunting moments.”

Zoe Theodore, “Reviews: Scum Ballet”, Un Projects, Dec. 21, 2017
Full article: http://unprojects.org.au/un-extended/reviews/scum-ballet/


“an exquisitely creepy collapse between the threat of violence and its opposite, love and care.”

Naomi Riddle, “Review: Scum Ballet”, Rundog Magazine, Dec. 1, 2017
Full article: http://rundog.art/angela-goh-scum-ballet/


“imbued with a sense of ritual and magic and endowed with symbolism that is variously literal and elusive… a collective expression of strength and considerable endurance”

Keith Gallaasch, “Angela Goh, Scum Ballet: Female Magic”, RealTime, Dec. 5, 2017
Full article: http://www.realtime.org.au/angela-goh-scum-ballet-female-magic/



Selected Reviews, Predictable Dances:


“What the audience bears witness to, is a process through which the future is manifest in a body, in the present… Through its unwavering commitment to its own weird dream-logic, this piece is perhaps the understated highlight of the evening… “

Elyssia Bugg, “Live Review: PRECOG – Next Wave x Liquid Architecture”,  Difficult Fun, May 20, 2018
Full article: https://difficultfun.com/2018/05/20/live-review-precog-next-wave-x-liquid-architecture/


“As the simple fulfilment of a prophecy, her performance removed any social and critical networks from around the activity of dance itself, with the act seen here as containing the parameters of its own flexible context… whatever occurred in Angela’s dance was simply meant to be.”

Sebastian Henry-Jones, “Lessons to Learn from Dancing”, Art and Australia, April 29, 2017
Full article: http://www.artandaustralia.com/online/discursions/lessons-learn-dancing